How to Make Perfectly Clear Ice Cubes for Cocktails

clear ice cube

We know – it’s at the top of your to-do list. How to make clear ice cubes.

Clear ice is all the rage. When you’re a foodie, every detail counts. And what could be more attractive than stylish, unusual hunks of clear ice in your fancy cocktail?

So what’s the secret to clear ice, anyway? The answer is two-fold: pure water and slow freezing. You need to start with filtered or distilled water. Then, for extra insurance, boil the water before pouring it into trays. (Some recommend boiling the water not once, but twice, for extra, extra insurance. Seems like overkill to me. But then again, you have chosen to make clear ice.) Additionally, if the water goes into the freezer still hot, this slows down the freezing time, which assists in making crystal clear ice. Easy, right?! (Just don’t put fully boiling water into plastic trays, ahem.)

Now you’ve got the secret to clear ice. But what about the shape of the ice? Wouldn’t it be sexier to have carved ice cubes as opposed to cubes from ordinary old trays? Alcademics recommends putting your (distilled, boiled, still warm) water into a cooler and placing the whole thing in the freezer. Follow their step-by-step instructions for carving the ice.

Howcast recommends using muffin tins for larger and longer lasting ice. Who wants a diluted drink? Genius!

The site American Drink also has some good tips for making perfect ice, such as keeping your freezer clean to prevent the ice from absorbing wayward smells and buying better quality ice trays, such as these from Tovolo.

Enough said, I think it’s time for that perfect cocktail on the rocks!

“For some ridiculous reason, it is considered ‘deep’ to value intellect, and shallow to value ‘beauty’. Beauty is much harder to find, impossible to imitate, and incomparable in its effect on the human spirit.” – Goldfarb on cooking, 2009.

Image: Buena Vista Images

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DISCUSSION

2 thoughts on “How to Make Perfectly Clear Ice Cubes for Cocktails

  1. While this looks like a fun experiment, it seems like the article is encouraging people to use even more energy when making their ice cubes than they already do. How is this eco-friendly?

  2. I’ve never tried to make clear ice before, but am definitely going to try this. Wish me luck! (I’ll leave the carving to the pros)

 

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